The Prevalence of Depression in Saudi Medical Students

Authors

Imran Akhtar Siddiqui
Jamal Khaled Saud Al jamal
Khalid Al Qumaizi
Sufyan Akram

Theme

Trends in curriculum planning and development

Category

Curriculum planning

INSTITUTION

King Saud bin Abdulaziz University

Background

 

Several studies have shown higher prevalence of psychological morbidities among medical students. Depression is one of those morbidities and can affect their life, study and future career. Our objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms among Saudi medical students, and to know how common is.
 
Conclusion

 

The results of this study showed a high prevalence of depression among medical students. Our findings are consistent with the findings from other studies conducted in other parts of the world using different screening tools for depression.
Characteristics of Depression
 
Take-home Messages
Since, high prevalence of depression is found in our students; therefore, early screening of the psychiatric morbidities and preventive programs should begin early in their medical program.
Summary of Work

 

A cross-sectional study was conducted on medical students both in pre-clinical and clinical phases at the College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. A total number of 127 male students were recruited to this study and were asked to complete the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II). Out of 127 students, 120 (94%) completed the inventory, from fourth year (n= 36, 30.3%), third year (n= 25, 21.5%), second year (n=35, 29.1%), first year (n=24, 18.9%).
Comparison of Groups
 
Summary of Results

 

We found high prevalence of depression in our students. Prevalence of depression was found in 49% students. Out of 49% students with depression 49% were with mild depression, 45% were with moderate depression and 6% with severe depression.
 
Severity of Depression
Acknowledgement
References

 

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Background
Conclusion
Take-home Messages
Summary of Work
Summary of Results
Acknowledgement
References

 

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